hey, 2018? you best not suck!

I suppose it’s traditional in the last week of a calendar year to reflect on the year behind and predict for the year ahead. I’m certainly not immune to that impulse, nor am I immune to the predictable impulse to make promises to myself on how to improve the next year. Maybe we constantly think that the previous year’s sucktastic aspects were somehow our fault, and if we just change our attitude (or latitude), those problems won’t come back.

Instead of trying to come up with something on my own that I could implement as a resolution for 2018, I put the question to my Facebook feed. My Facebook friends – some of whom I’ve known for many years & some I’ve never met in person – chimed in with some suggestions. Here they are, with some commentary. At the bottom will be my actual resolution(s) that I thought up on my own.

REJECTED

  • Don’t make resolutions. I get this – don’t set yourself up for failure & you’ll have nothing to feel bad about, right? As a thought experiment, however, resolutions can be fun and educational. (Learning about yourself counts as educational, right?)
  • Manufacture jenkem in my basement. I had to look up what jenkem is, and I will not be fermenting human waste inside the house – or anywhere else, for that matter.
  • Throat punch more people. While probably morally satisfying, throat-punching people could lead to prison time. Not interested.
  • Kick a dog a day. Funny, sure, but not practical. Where I live in semi-rural suburban Richmond, Virginia, kicking somebody’s dog could get you shot. Plus I like dogs. Other people’s dogs. My daughter wants to get a dog in the worst way, but I know how much work it is to take care of a dog and I’m not ready to commit to that yet.

ABIDE

This one-word suggestion was probably my favorite. I’ve seen The Big Lebowsky just once, and honestly, while I thought it was funny, it didn’t resonate with me in the same way it has for many of its fans. My favorite scene was the beach funeral. So, so funny!

At any rate, abide is somewhat of a mantra for the movie’s main character, and it can in many ways be seen as the central tenet of Buddhism as well. No – wait for it – and trust me. Buddhist philosophy centers around the interconnectedness of all beings and all things. Enlightenment comes from glimpses of the true nature of this interconnectedness. We achieve enlightenment by opening our minds to the true nature of the world around us … and to do that, we must abide.

Most of the suggestions I received I can subordinate under abide, and so I have.

  • Don’t be a dick and Be kind. Google’s mantra used to be don’t be evil. They’ve moved away from that, but in general I think don’t be a dick is a great suggestion. The world would be a better place if fewer of us acted more in the interests of positivity instead of selfishness, and selfishness is the root cause of being a dick. Being kind is the polar opposite of being a dick, so these two suggestions work together. I love these suggestions, and I do hereby resolve to do my best not to be a dick (and therefore be more kind) in 2018.
  • Do something nice for someone I don’t know and Pay someone a compliment each day. Two more complimentary suggestions, and both will take me out of my comfort zone. I don’t consider myself a particularly nice person – meaning that I don’t feel I go out of my way to make other people’s lives better in meaningful ways. My family, sure. My closest circle of friends, sure. My coworkers, sometimes (when it benefits the company). In general, however, I am going to struggle with this, but I will try!
  • Add value to the space & lives around me and Find wonder, joy & beauty in the world. These were suggestions that struck me deeply and made me sit back and think a bit. The person the former came from has had a hard couple of years when it comes to family, with both unexpected gains and unexpected losses. Their family has had to move a few times in the past few years, something that can be quite stressful on kids. That they took this tack – adding value – is abstract enough to encompass many things, and I think that makes it easier to achieve. Find wonder, joy & beauty is something I will definitely have to work on, but I love the sentiment behind it. We read and experience negativity on such a large scale that it’s difficult to find the good things in life. I will try to see the positive.
  • Learn & do new things and Think more about being than doing. Another great pair of suggestions. When we stop learning, we stop growing. When we focus more on the experience of something than what it does for us, we harm our own growth. While I won’t be jumping out of airplanes, I think it would be fun and educational to try things in 2018 that I’ve never tried before.
  • Have fun. Duh, right? We often don’t think about life in this fashion, however, so getting a reminder from a friend to have fun is refreshing. I do a number of things that should be fun, but the fun in them is often lost or missed because I’m focused on other things. I need to work on that.
  • Wear great socks. I have terrible fashion sense, even for a fat guy. I should work on that.
  • Use fewer plastic items. This is a fantastic – and concrete – suggestion. Plastic comes from petroleum, and anything I can do to reduce the use of petroleum products is going to be good for all of us in the long run.

PLAY LIVE (MUSIC) WITH SOMEONE AGAIN

(also Play more guitar and Play guitar (nearly) every day) It’s no secret that I retired from being in bands several years ago. I do not miss being in a band. I do not, in general, miss playing live. I do not miss the constant, complex management of interpersonal relationships it takes to hold a band together.

I do, however, miss playing. I miss recording. I miss making music with friends.

In December, I committed to playing a show with one of my former bands some time in the first half of the year. I’ll post details when I have them. To make sure I don’t suck when that show comes around, I’ll be practicing and getting my chops back. In addition, I have a new guitar arriving the first of the year. It’s what people in the guitar world call a Partsocaster.

DRINK MORE WATER AND CONSUME LESS SUGAR

While I may have to soft-pedal Have cheese fondue more often and Eat waffles a bit, I think we can all agree that changing one’s diet is one of the resolutions people make the most often for the new year. It’s probably the one they fail on the most often, too. I am over 40 and overweight, so I know I need to pay closer attention to what I eat and how much (and how often) I exercise. I gave up soda on a lark in 2017 – I got tired of the constant caffeine headaches and sugar high-and-low cycles. I don’t drink coffee, but I usually have a cup of tea most days. I have been drinking more water, but I could always drink more.

CUT DOWN ON CLUTTER

This suggestion tied in nicely with Clean out & throw away one item a day. I’m not going to get into Swedish death cleaning or snuggle my stuff to see if it sparks joy, but decluttering a room is a great metaphor for life. We could all stand to declutter. I have too much stuff – physical stuff and metaphysical stuff. I need to engage in a thorough cleaning of my house, my space and my mind.

I’ve already started by clearing out thousands of old photos stored on my phone and organizing them so just the ones I want to see regularly are on there. The rest have been organized and move to a computer hard drive.

RUN TO THE HILLS

My friend who suggested this knows of my unwavering loyalty to the British metal band Iron Maiden, but I took his comment from a philosophical standpoint rather than a literal one. I need to Spend more time riding a motorcycle and Go somewhere I’ve never been. If I Have more adventures (see/do one new thing a month), I’ll easily be able to Run to the hills in 2018. I did zero travel in 2017 that wasn’t work-related, mostly because of my dire employment situation throughout the bulk of the year. It’s not that I didn’t have fun sometimes, but if I wasn’t going somewhere for work, I didn’t go. Period.

I already have a plan, something that was germinating in my mind. I’ve written it down, which lends things a more concrete aspect, and I’ll be working on a plan.

One of my friends suggested I Play more wargames – one of my hobbies that I’ve drifted away from in recent years for various reasons. He’s right, and I would very much like to liven that hobby back up a bit in the coming year.

THE THINGS I THOUGHT OF

I have to thank my Facebook friends for coming up with some great suggestions – even if I rejected some of them. Look at it this way, Paul – your suggestion I manufacture jenkem in my basement led me to learn something about the nature of hallucinogenic substances, the popularity of some of those things in other parts of the world, and how stories can explode on the internet despite little basis in truth. It was quite educational!

Before I asked for suggestions on Facebook, I already had three things that I wanted to work on in 2018.

PHOTOGRAPHY

I found myself using my phone more often than not in 2017, simply because I lost the desire to cart my big, heavy DSLR rig around. When I did lug it around – the work trip to Denver and Salt Lake City comes to mind – I hardly used it and subsequently resented the effort it took to haul it with me. Resentment led to less desire to use it, even though when I did use it, I still like it.

My friend & coworker Bill switched from Canon to Fujifilm a few years ago and has enjoyed his new cameras. He clued me in to a new camera Fujifilm was due to release in late 2017, the X-E3. I did some research and decided that could well be the camera for me, but when it came out, it cost over $1,000 to get the body and one of their kit lenses. After being savagely underemployed for most of 2017, I’m still a little gun shy when it comes to spending money, so I just couldn’t justify coming up off the money for the X-E3.

Instead, I did more research into Fujifilm’s X-series cameras and decided to pick up a used X100. It’s a fixed lens camera – meaning you can’t take the lens off and put another one on – and I got it for a couple hundred dollars. It’s not as powerful as my DSLR, but it’s just as flexible, and what’s more important is the thing weighs less than a pound. Early test photos are sharp and clean and I even pulled over while driving the other day to take pictures of something I saw on the side of the road. I haven’t done that in a long time.

I’m also planning to use up some of my remaining film stock in 2018, using my Fujifilm GW690. It’s looking like 2018 will be the year of the rangefinder, which I’m excited about.

IMG_7112

That’s the GW690 on the left and the X100 on the right. The GW690 is a big camera, which makes the X100 look even smaller.

USING LOCAL BUSINESSES

Like many people, I may be addicted to the (nearly) instant gratification afforded to us by Amazon. In 2018, I plan to back off from that – part of my decluttering process – and try to use more local businesses for my everyday purchases. Fewer chain stores, fewer chain restaurants, fewer chain gas stations, that kind of thing. It’s important to me to support my community – one of the main reasons I wanted to leave Fairfax County for someplace less developed and with less population density was to live in a community I felt needed my support. I live in such a community now, and I want to become more ingrained into its small business economy.

MOTORCYCLE TRAINING

My motorcycling skills are stagnating as I find myself riding for work more often than for fun. There’s nothing wrong with that, but much of my riding in 2017 was just to get someplace, rather than to enjoy being on a motorcycle. I found myself confused in a number of situations, unsure what to do, and I decided to do something about that in 2018.

My primary serious, concrete resolution for 2018 is to take four motorcycle training classes – two for road riding and two for off-road riding. I’m sure I’ll write about it, so you’ll know about it if I succeed or fail in this endeavor.

DONE

Well, that’s it for the 2018 resolution cycle. I’m going to try to be less of a dick, simplify my life in a lot of ways (including photography), hold down a full-time job for the whole year, bring & find joy, use local businesses, get some training, and in general take better care of myself. We’ll see how it goes – and thanks for coming along for the ride!

(Yes, mom, I will Call my mother and of course I will Tell my children I love them every day. Those things are easy!)

Fist

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time to change the name of lee-davis high school

It’s become trendy in the last couple of years to propose renaming schools that bear the names of Confederate figures of importance. I support this trend because it first and foremost allows those whose values have evolved since the 1860s and 1950s to put their stamp on their communities. In Hanover County, Virginia, people are starting to talk about renaming Lee-Davis High School, so let’s take a look at the school’s namesakes.

Robert_Edward_Lee_by_Julian_Vannerson

Photo of Robert E. Lee by Julian Vannerson.

Robert E. Lee was born in 1807 in Virginia, and he died in 1870 in Virginia. He lived in Virginia all of his life, except when he was off serving in the military. He served in the military forces of the United States from 1829 to 1861, and he served the Confederate government’s army from 1861 to 1865.

By the end of the US Civil War, he was the general in charge of the entire Confederate army, and resistance against the United States collapsed after he surrendered his command to US forces at Appomattox Courthouse in April, 1865. Due to what is widely attributed as a clerical error, his citizenship in the United States wasn’t restored during his lifetime. Congress restored his citizenship in 1975, backdating it 110 years.

Lee was a military officer of distinction, having excelled at the United States Military Academy (aka West Point) and served in the Mexican-American War in the 1840s. He opposed the construction of memorials to his fellow rebels following the Civil War and supported the reestablishment of the pre-Civil War nation. However, he opposed racial equality and publicly spoke out against voting rights for former slaves throughout the remainder of his life.

Jefferson-Davis-by-Mathew-Brady

Photo of Jefferson Davis by Mathew Brady.

Jefferson Davis was born in Kentucky in 1808, and he died in Louisiana in 1889. He lived in various places in the south, including a stint in Richmond, Virginia, when he was president of the ill-fated Confederate States of America (1861-65). He continued to live in Virginia until 1867, when he was released from prison. Following his time in prison, Davis lived in Quebec, not returning to the US until President Andrew Johnson issued him a pardon in 1868. He then moved to Tennessee, where he ran an insurance company. He lived on an estate (bequeathed to him by a wealthy widow) in Biloxi, Mississippi, during his final years.

Davis continued to espouse racist and divisive rhetoric to the end of his days, though he did so primarily in private. His several attempts to return to legislative service following his pardon and return to the US failed.

In 1958, Virginia was caught up in the torrent of the civil rights movement. The US Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision led to the forced integration of public schools across the country. The response to this legal order by the governor of Virginia, Harry Byrd, was the establishment of Massive Resistance. Instead of obeying the Supreme Court, Byrd and his supporters in Virginia’s legislature effectively shut down as much of Virginia’s public education system as they could as a way to prevent Virginia’s black school-age children from receiving an education equal in quality – and with equal access – to that of their white contemporaries.

Also in 1958, Hanover County, Virginia, was nearly finished constructing a brand-new high school along US Highway 360. The high school was the newest in the county; located in the town of Mechanicsville, the residents were justifiably proud of its construction. They chose to call the new educational facility Lee-Davis High School. At the time, naming public schools after Confederate figures was common practice across the southern states as a way to push back against the growing tide of the civil rights movement, and anybody that opposed the name of the new school would have remained silent about it, possibly out of fear for their personal safety. The Lee-Davis Confederates became a centerpiece of Mechanicsville life, and the school’s mission “to prepare students for success” remains, for all intents and purposes, a clearly obtainable objective in the 21st century.

lee-davis-hs

(To be perfectly honest, I find the naming of schools after any person to be ridiculous. New York City has the right idea with its Public School Number system. There’s no reason Lee-Davis couldn’t have been called Mechanicsville High School when it was built, or even Hanover County High School Number 2, both of which would have been both descriptive and adequate.)

Two of Hanover County’s other high schools – Atlee HS (1991) and Hanover HS (2003) – have simple, descriptive names that denote their location rather than singling out any individual for the honor of a name plate. The county’s other high school that opened in 1959, Patrick Henry HS, came about by consolidating four small schools into one. PHHS is named after Hanover County’s most famous resident, the American Revolutionary War figure Patrick Henry – you know, the “give me liberty or give me death” guy. He was also Virginia’s first governor following the establishment of the United States of America. Henry was born in Hanover County – in Studley, as a matter of fact, which is about five miles from my house. He lived his whole life in the state and died in Virginia, and though he was a slave owner, he actively supported efforts to end the importation of slaves into the USA.

If you have to name a school after a person, Hanover County got it right when they named Patrick Henry High School. Henry was a prominent, positive figure in American history, one that – despite his status as a slave owner – we can all respect. He also is from the county of the school that bears his name. It’s as appropriate a name as can be found, although West Hanover County High School would have been perfectly acceptable.

It’s time to eliminate the names of Confederate figures from our public education facilities. It’s time to allow all students to have and show pride in their schools and their schools’ mascots. The idea of black students at Lee-Davis cheering on their schoolmates under the moniker of the Confederates disgusts me to no end. While I can see why Robert E. Lee’s name would be attached to a school in Virginia, there is no reason to put Jefferson Davis’ name on any public education building in the state for the simple fact that he’s not from here, he lived here only briefly, spent part of that time in prison, and the only reason his name was attached to the school in the first place was to reinforce the dominance of the white population of the state over its black population during a time of social upheaval.

Instead of continuing the support the legacy of those who fought to preserve slavery (Lee and Davis) and those who fought to preserve educational segregation (Byrd), it’s time to support the legacy of local kids and the hope for the future they hold in their young hands and minds.

Change the name of Lee-Davis High School to Mechanicsville High School and put the establishment of a new mascot to a public vote in the school’s district.

the year in music: 2017

Another bleak music year – which probably says more about me than the music industry. I have a hard time getting into new bands. I listen to what I listen to, and it’s just tough to break into that circle. I was also majorly underemployed for the first nine months of the year, which put a damper on my discretional spending.

Despite that, I have to call 2017 the year of Gojira. I had heard of this French heavy metal band in the past, but not enough to care to give them a listen. That changed when I saw a YouTube video of one of their songs, which led to me getting their From Mars to Sirius album in 2016. I liked that one enough to pick up the two albums that followed it this year, and all three albums are getting heavy rotation. I don’t even mind that they don’t play guitar solos, which is usually a deal-breaker for me when it comes to new bands.

Top 10 By Listens

10. Sarah Jarosz – Song Up in Her Head (2009). I went to see Jarosz play at what is basically a minor-league NASCAR track. They have a concert venue in one of the buildings big enough to hold a couple hundred people. Fantastic show, really pleased I got to see her play live at last. Even though her newest album (Undercurrent, 2016) is good, it’s still her first album that catches my attention every time. This album didn’t make the Top 20 last year, but I listened to it a lot in 2016, too.

9. Mastodon – Once More ‘Round the Sun (2014). This was my #1 album of 2015 and ranked #8 in 2016, so clearly I am still enjoying this album a lot. I’m surprised it made the Top 10 given that Mastodon came out with a new album in 2017, but there it is nonetheless.

8. Eric Johnson – Europe Live (2014). I bought this album last year and it has quickly become my favorite EJ live album. His playing never ceases to amaze me, and I love a good live album. “Cliffs of Dover” still blows me away every time he plays it.

7. Pink Floyd – Animals (1977). I will not hide the fact that Animals remains my favorite Pink Floyd album, and I listen to it a lot. I have a half-dozen versions of it between LPs and CDs. I even had the 8-track once upon a time! The musicianship and songcrafting still amazes me after all these years. Back in the Top 10 after a year off.

6. Gojira – From Mars to Sirius (2014). I’m not the biggest fan of growly vocals and I don’t tend to like things from, about or made in France. I tell you that so you’ll understand just how hard it is for Gojira to break into my album rotation, let alone actually make it into the Top 10 of my annual list. This album is that good. The two albums that follow it, The Way of All Flesh and Magma are also excellent, but there’s something about the aggression and environmental awareness of From Mars to Sirius that resonates with me. My favorite track is “Global Warming,” an eight-minute song in which nearly the entire guitar part is finger-tapped.

5. Fear Factory – Genexus (2015). Last year’s #4 album is this year’s #5, showing that it remains strong in the rotation. Fear Factory’s precision metal and mix of growly and melodic vocals keeps bringing me back.

4. Dead Can Dance – The Serpent’s Egg (1988, 2008 remaster). I’ve had DCD’s “greatest hits album” A Passage in Time since I took a creative writing class in college in probably 1993 or ’94; the professor liked to use it to set a mood for our in-class writing exercises. I always dug that album, but found myself wanting to know what one of their regular studio albums sounded like. I chose the one that had the most songs on APIT, and that’s this one. It’s cool, mellow and thought-provoking, even if you can’t understand the lyrics. I think they sing in Latin, but it could be Dutch for all I know. Sometimes it’s English, but not usually.

3. Ghost – Popestar (2016). One of the things that Ghost does that I like is they like to put out singles – but instead of just releasing one song, they do an EP that has the new single plus a few cover songs. There’s no doubt that Popestar’s centerpiece, “Square Hammer,” was a huge, huge song for Ghost, but for me, the standouts on this EP are their covers of Eurhythmics’ “Missionary Man” and a song called “Bible” originally performed by Imperiet, a Swedish band that nobody has ever heard of. Ghost translated “Bible” into English, and it recounts the myth of God creating the heavens and the Earth in just six days. It’s a slow-building song, and its climax is worth waiting for. Ghost’s version of “Nocturnal Me,” originally by Echo & the Bunnymen, is also excellent.

2. Baroness – Yellow & Green (2012). Last year’s #3 album was Baroness’ Purple – a good album, but it didn’t even make the Top 20 this year. I reverted back to the album that drew me to Baroness in the first place. Their Red album was just outside the Honorable Mentions this year. This is a double album, and it’s fantastic. If you only get one Baroness album, this is the one to get.

mastodon_emperorofsand1. Mastodon – Emperor of Sand. Ever since I discovered Mastodon’s Leviathan, I have gotten everything they put out as soon as they put it out. They are as good a metal band as there has ever been. One of the things I dig about them is that whatever their next album is, it doesn’t sound exactly like their last album. That’s funny, because the thing I dig most about Slayer is that their next album sounds just like their last one. Anyway – Emperor of Sand is probably Mastodon’s most accessible album. The songs are mostly under five minutes and while there’s plenty of progressive influence still apparent, there are tons of hooks and catchy choruses abound. “Sultan’s Curse” is practically a pop song – sure, it would be a pop song about cancer, but still. There’s only two songs on the album over six minutes long and the longest of them is just under eight – compare that to “Pendulous Skin” from Blood Mountain at over 22 minutes long, “The Czar” and “The Last Baron” from Crack the Skye (11 & 13 minutes long respectively), and the nearly 14-minute-long, mostly instrumental “Hearts Alive” from Leviathan. This is an astounding album, topping 2015’s Once More ‘Round the Sun, which I called their best to date in 2016.

Honorable mentions (#11-15) on this year’s most-played list are AC/DC, For Those About To Rock (a perennial favorite, #5 last year); Black Label Society, Stronger Than Death (#6 last year); Enigma, Le Roi Est Mort, Vive Le Roi (what can I say? I had an electronica phase); Slayer, God Hates Us All (replacing their Repentless in my top rotation); and Ghost, Meliora (last year’s #9).

Albums Purchased in 2017

  • Darkest Hour – Godless Prophets & The Migrant Flora. I know DH’s bass player Aaron Deal. Great guy, fantastic bass player. I got in on their crowdfunding campaign to get their newest album put out, and if you like growly vocals and aggressive metal, you will probably love this album.
  • Dead Can Dance – The Serpent’s Egg (1988, 2008 remaster)
  • Eve 6 – It’s All in Your Head (2011) and Speak in Code (2012). I really love this band’s Horrorscope album and got the bug to hear what they’ve done since that album. While I wasn’t hugely disappointed or regret spending the money, neither of these albums is going to make it into heavy rotation.
  • Sarah Jarosz – Undercurrent (2016). Another solid album from Jarosz as she slowly moves away from her bluegrass roots and towards becoming the queen (or at least a princess) of Americana. I bought this directly from Jarosz at her concert. Nice lady.
  • Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings – Soul of a Woman. I got this album after seeing a documentary about Jones; she was a late-in-life success story and cut down in the prime of her career by cancer. This is a mind-bendingly good rhythm & blues album that any fan of the genre or powerful female singers would be well advised to pick up. Think Ike-era Tina Turner, but with more attitude and a better horn section.
  • Kaleo – A/B (2016). My coworkers were playing this in the office one day, and I liked it enough to pick it up for myself. They’re sort of Zeppelin-esque with a modern sensibility, and at least one song on this album is in their native Icelandic language. I can’t understand the lyrics, but it’s a great song.
  • KXM – Scatterbrain. This is probably my biggest disappointment of the year, CD-purchase wise. On its surface, the blending of dUg Pinnick (King’s X), George Lynch (Dokken) and Ray Luzier (Korn) should produce music that is both forceful and memorable; unfortunately, this album is only the former. It’s good, but it’s forgettable, unfortunately.
  • Gojira – The Way of All Flesh (2015) and Magma (2016). My obsession with Gojira continues to grow. I will keep working my way back through their catalog one CD at a time.
  • Iron Maiden – The Book of Souls (2015). I went to see Iron Maiden last summer. It was a great show – as expected – but Maiden’s newest songs are … well, competent. They sound like Iron Maiden, and I’m glad they’re still writing new music, but this double album goes on for too long – both in song count and in individual song lengths. The closing track is an endless, meandering piano piece that I would have been happy to never hear.
  • Killer Be Killed – Killer Be Killed (2014). I only got this album a few days ago, having heard about it right before Thanksgiving. It’s Troy Sanders (bass/vox) from Mastodon, Max Calavera (guitar/vox) from Sepultura, and a couple of guys I never heard of from bands I’m barely familiar with. The first few listens are promising – good, old-fashioned metal right here.
  • Mastodon – Emperor of Sand and Cold Dark Place. Cold Dark Place is an EP of songs that were left off the Once More ‘Round the Sun and Emperor of Sand albums. I manipulated the song info in iTunes to include them with the albums they were recorded for, and I think they play quite well in that manner. A nice add-on release from Mastodon.
  • Pinnick Gales Pridgen – PGP 2 (2014). I picked this album up simply for the sake of having both PGP albums – King’s X is one of my favorite bands and I love dUg Pinnick’s voice and bass playing. Eric Gales is a MONSTER guitarist, and Thomas Pridgen (The Mars Volta) is a fantastic drummer. This album isn’t quite as good as their self-titled debut, but it’s worth repeated listenings.
  • Joe Walsh – The Definitive Collection (2006). What can I say? I love Joe Walsh and decided to pick up this greatest hits CD that spans his career from The James Gang to his post-Eagles solo work. It’s fun. The dude can PLAY!

There is no Movie Top 10 this year because – well, I was unemployed for nine months and didn’t spend money on going to the movies. I saw Murder on the Orient Express last night because the power was out at my house and I was bored. Even though the movie was good, it did not cure my boredom. I’ll go see the new Star Wars movie next week, but other than that and Wonder Woman, there wasn’t much to catch my attention in the movie theaters in 2017.