understanding tariffs and how they work

Tariffs have been big news lately, part of the news cycle that overhypes everything Trump-related for the glory of clicks and views. It’s a little crazy, and it’s a bit hard to understand everything related to tariffs, so I’m here to give you a little basic info.

A tariff is a tax, that’s the bottom line. Tariffs are levied by governments, which is why they are a type of tax, and they are levied specifically on goods of one sort or another.  Traditionally, tariffs are levied on imported goods, that is, items made outside the United States and brought into the country to be sold to Americans for fun and profit.  Another word for a tariff is a duty; while the two words have slightly different connotations when it comes to imported goods, we use them as equivalents for each other. I’ll be using tariff throughout this post.

(You can read another post I wrote about tariffs, “protective tariffs, motorcycles and the beef lobby.”)

The first tariff in US history came from the Tariff Act of 1789, and indeed it was the first law of any sort passed by the new government established by the US Constitution (also created in 1789).  The new US government needed to not just boost, but create an economy that would sustain its efforts, and they still (to a certain extent) held a grudge against England.  It’s no joke that England was an economic powerhouse in the late 18th century – the British Empire legit ruled most of the world at that point.  However, the new US government found itself needing to promote business and manufacturing at home, so that’s where the impetus for the Tariff Act of 1789 came from.

The US and UK signed a treaty in 1783 that ended the American Revolution; one of the aspects of that treaty allowed the British unfettered navigation of the Mississippi River.  This greatly benefitted the British, but did not benefit the Americans much.  The British pushed the favor by passing the Navigation Acts (in 1783), which forced non-British ships – especially American ones – to pay heavy duties (i.e. taxes) when they offloaded their goods in British ports.  The Brits followed this law up with two others that further restricted American goods getting into British hands, so the Tariff Act of 1789 was in part a retaliation against this sequence of laws enacted by the British Parliament.

The Tariff Act of 1789 required foreign ships offloading goods in US ports to pay 50 cents per ton, while US-registered ships paid just 6 cents per ton.

Here’s an easy way to understand the situation.  Let’s say you make sails, and you charge $5 for a ton of sails.  You can sell your sails in America for $6 a ton and do well.  If you make your sails in England, and ship them to the United States, your distributor/importer has to pay $6.50 for one ton of sails.  If you make sails in the US (and transport them via ship), your distributor has to pay $6.06 for their ton of sails.

boat-classic-clouds-173910There’s the kicker, then. If you, as the distributor, sell both US- and UK-made sails, you can sell them to retailers at the same price, $7 a ton.  If you do that, you make just 50 cents on the UK-made sails, while raking in 94 cents on the US-made sails.

Let’s take it a step further, though, because what retailer makes just 50 cents on something?  No, as the retailer, you’re going to sell your UK-made sails for $10 a ton. This ups your profit to $3.50 a ton, but you can justify that higher price because those sails are made in England, and of course everybody knows British ships are awesome and they have been ruling the oceans for decades, so UK-made sails command a premium for their real or perceived quality difference over US-made sails.  Raising the price of the imported sails enables you to absorb the cost of the tariff.  Get this, though – everybody knows there’s a 50 cents-per-ton tariff on UK-made sails, so you can charge $10.50 per ton and now you’re making $4 per ton in profit without anybody complaining, because they know that 50 cents is going to the government, which of course is protecting you and American business/industry.

Jump back and look at the US-made sails, though.  Sure, they’re slightly inferior quality to the premium UK-made sails, but ships gotta have sails, right?  Instead of selling them for $7 a ton, you can sell them for $8 a ton, which gives people the impression they’re still getting a deal over the UK-made sails, but now you’ve upped your profit to $1.94 per ton, and because of the $2 per ton price difference, you’re likely to sell more US-made sails than UK-made ones, which improves your overall bottom line.  You can even up the price to $8.50 a ton, which still keeps them $2/ton below the cost of the UK-made sails (profit now $2.44/ton). You can safely buy fewer tons of UK-made sails, knowing you’ll sell more US-made ones at the now artificially higher price.  Plus you can feel good for supporting US industry!

There’s some lessons in there to unpack.

  1.  Tariffs are taxes charged to import goods into a country.
  2.  Tariffs can be absorbed by the importer or passed on to the consumer.
  3.  Because tariffs artificially raise the price of imported goods, domestic goods can be priced high and still look like a bargain to the consumer.

Think about this, though: What distributor in their right mind is going to eat the cost of the tariff?  That’s not good business, especially if your margins are razor-thin, like they are for many goods.  We’re talking mere cents of profit, with businesses relying on volume to really make money.  Wouldn’t you, a smart business owner in a capitalist economy, pass the cost of the tariff straight on to your customer?  Yes, you would, because you need to maintain your margins for your business to succeed.  You were already selling your goods for as low a price as you could, so you can’t really absorb the cost of the tariff.  The importer passes it on to the distributor, the distributor passes it on to the retailer, the retailer passes it on to the consumer.

Thus, the most important lesson of all: THE CONSUMER PAYS THE TARIFF.

This is not unique to the United States.  European consumers pay their tariff costs, Chinese consumers pay their tariff costs, Indian consumers pay their tariff costs and so on, just like American consumers do.

You might be wondering who benefits from higher tariffs, or really from tariffs at all. The government levying the tax is who benefits.  They collect the tariff up front at the ports.  They collect taxes on the money made by the distributor, the wholesaler and the retailer.  They then collect a sales tax when the consumer buys the product.  The government benefits every step of the way from tariffs, and that, my friends, is the whole reason tariffs exist in the first place – no matter where you live, no matter what form of government you are under and no matter what types of goods you’re buying.

Remember that.

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done with the state of the union address

Once upon a time, I was a rabid football fan. I spent nearly every weekend holed up here or there, ingesting endless hours of college and pro football to the point where I knew the names of some of the key players’ wives and mothers just from hearing them so much.
podiumThen one day, the NFL players started complaining about how they were being treated and their pay rates. I read article after article about the issue and discovered I gave absolutely zero fucks about how bad these players who were being paid millions of dollars a year to play a game – granted, a brutal and punishing game – felt they were being treated by team owners and the league.

I believe everybody should be paid a fair wage for the work they do, and playing in the NFL is definitely work, so don’t get me wrong – these guys SHOULD be paid. I had to take a hard look at what my fanaticism said about me, though, and I decided that supporting that many millionaires with my time, effort and loyalty was unwarranted.  I gave up the NFL and focused on college ball.

Not long after that – maybe a couple of years – I started paying attention to how much college players are exploited by the NCAA sports-industrial complex, which essentially commoditizes young men and turns them into entertainment revenue without truly compensating them. Sure, they get a college education, but if you want to know how that works, you should take a look at NCAA Division I football graduation rates.  Without getting too much into it, the NCAA basically functions as a feeder league for the NFL and since I gave up the NFL, I felt like a hypocrite for continuing to support the NFL by being an NCAA football consumer.

What I noticed after walking away from NCAA football is how much free time I had on the weekends.  It was amazing.  Watching football had become the equivalent of a part-time weekend job for me, and bailing on it gave me time to do numerous rewarding things with my life, like spend time with my family, play music and ride motorcycles.  I haven’t watched the Super Bowl in close to 10 years and haven’t seen an NCAA bowl game in at least 8 – don’t even get me started on the NCAA’s “playoff” system.

I told you all that to tell you this: I’m walking away from the State of the Union address.

For the last 6 or 8 years or so, I haven’t been watching the SOTU because I haven’t had cable TV and am not interested in sitting in front of my computer to stream this annual event.  I satisfied myself by poring over transcripts of the address, as well as the enemy – er, opposite party’s retribution – um, I mean rebuttal – and basing my analysis on WHAT was said rather than HOW THEY SAID IT.  I felt removing the viewable event aspect of the SOTU helped me better understand what was being said without bias derived from facial expressions, hand movements, etc.

That’s over as well now.  Not SOTU for me, no more. It’s not that I don’t care about the country or our politics, because I do.  Rather, it’s that the SOTU has slowly become political theater, an opportunity for the president to grandstand, pontificate, bloviate, obfuscate and outright lie to the American public.  You might think because of the timing that I’m talking about Trump, and while I am, it’s not just him.  Trump is just the latest, worst offender when it comes to the SOTU.  Obama, both Bushes, Clinton, even Reagan all used the SOTU podium in a joint session of Congress to deliver a cheerleading chant rather than a substantive, thoughtful statement on the progress being made by and challenges to our society and its grand democratic experiment.

Add to that the opposite party’s “rebuttal” that follows directly on the SOTU’s heels and you have more political theater.  The other party isn’t listening to respond, they’re just waiting for their turn to say “NO – THAT IS ALL WRONG!” and do the same thing the president has done – bloviate, pontificate, obfuscate and lie to the American public.

From 2019 on, then, I will not be putting any of my time or attention into watching, listening to, reading, reading about or discussing the State of the Union address.  Instead I will pay attention to political events and issues that actually matter, that can serve to have some positive effect on our society and give us the opportunity to learn and grow rather than just listen to partisan rhetoric that gets nothing done and takes us nowhere.

unpacking the state of the union address

Everybody’s in a tizzle over Nancy Pelosi disinviting the president from delivering the traditional State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress.  Then everybody got in a tizzle over Donald Trump just cancelling the whole thing instead of finding another venue from which to deliver the speech.

If you ask me, it’s all more examples of Donny and The Nance acting like children instead of leaders, but that’s a discussion for another time.

This whole the president delivering a speech in front of a joint session of Congress thing is a tradition, anyway, not law.  George Washington addressed Congress, as did John Adams, but Thomas Jefferson said fuck that noise and sent his update to Congress in the form of a hand-written letter. Seems Jefferson felt the whole ritual smacked too much of what the kings of England used to do, so he ditched it.  Once the speeches started back up, they weren’t even called State of the Union addresses until Franklin Roosevelt started calling them that during the Great Depression. The name is catchy and it stuck.

For about 100 years after Jefferson ditched the speeches, presidents submitted written updates to Congress, not giving speeches at all.  That changed in 1913, when Woodrow Wilson gave his speech before Congress.  This was a big deal, not because Wilson was addressing Congress, but because everybody could see Europe headed towards war and Wilson wanted to push his agenda of neutrality.

The reality of the situation is this: the US Constitution requires the president to inform Congress “from time to time” about the state of the union.  Bottom line is that the president is required to do this, but there is nothing mandating it be an annual update, or even done regularly at all.  Congress has to agree to allow the president to give a speech to both chambers – aka a “joint session” – and that’s where we are.

Congress doesn’t have to allow the president to give the speech in their building, and the president doesn’t have to give a speech, let alone even submit an update to Congress on anything resembling a regular schedule.  Those two things – the speech part and the annual part – are simple traditions established by previous presidents and Congresses.  Sometimes there are even two updates given – one by an outgoing president at the end of his term and another by the incoming president at the start of his.

Some interesting facts for you – Jimmy Carter was the last president to submit only a written update, in 1981; Warren Harding delivered the first update broadcast on radio, in 1922; Harry Truman delivered the first update broadcast on television, in 1947; post-address commentary was added to the television broadcast for the first time in 1968 – Lyndon Johnson was president then; Bill Clinton delivered the first update streamed live on the internet, in 1997; the first response to the update given in Spanish was done by Gov. Bill Richardson (D-NM) in 2004; only one scheduled update has been postponed so far – Ronald Reagan pushed back his 1986 update due to the destruction of the space shuttle Challenger; only one scheduled update has so far been indefinitely postponed* – Donald Trump did this in 2019.

* This was initially written as “cancelled,” but Trump’s 2019 address has not been cancelled, but rather postponed indefinitely.

4 tips to spot a phishing attempt in your email

Phishing is one of the most visible and easy ways for internet bad guys – referred to in the biz as “threat actors” – to separate you from your personally identifiable information, or PII.  PII is how a threat actor can compromise your business and personal accounts, steal money from you (by gaining access to your credit card(s) or bank account(s)) and even take over your identity – all in the name of fraud.

Phishing attempts – or attacks, if you will – use legitimate-looking email in the hopes that you’ll click on the link(s) in them. Once you do, you’re usually exposed to one of a small number of types of attacks (“threat vectors”).

One threat vector associated with phishing attacks is the installation of malicious software (malware) on your computer, either as an application that’s hidden from your view or as an extension in your browser. Either way, your computer now has what many people will refer to as a “virus,” but is in reality software designed to snoop on you and your activities, all the while looking for and collecting your PII. Vicious types of malware will even take over the operation of your computer, enabling threat actors to spread their malware in a way that looks like YOU are the problem!

Another – and frankly, far more common – threat vector from phishing attacks involves simply getting you to try logging in to what you think is a legitimate website. Take, for instance, PayPal, a web-based payment service used by millions of people around the world.  If you get an email that looks like it’s from PayPal, say, like this one I got just this morning…

Looks legit, doesn’t it?  Many people would just click on the “update your information” button and BOOM! YOU’RE COMPROMISED! Instead of insta-clicking on that button, though – or any other link in the email – stop and think.  Is what the content of the email realistic?

  • Do you even have a PayPal account?
  • Do you actively use it?
  • When is the last time you updated your information/profile/payment/address?
  • Have you ever received an email like this from any company before?
  • Will PayPall really restrict your account if you don’t respond within 72 hours? Have they EVER done that to ANYBODY you know before?

Now, before you click on that button (or link), there’s two other things you can check to see if you’re being phished or not.  First, the reply-to address.  If it’s something like “support @ paypal.com” then it just might be a legit email – but no guarantees.  Continue to be suspicious and investigate the email. If it’s nothing to do with PayPal at all, then be suspicious. In the case of the actual email I received (above), this was the return email address

Does that say PayPal? NO IT DOES NOT.  That’s a big-ass red flag right there. (Note: If all you see in your email program is usually “no-reply” and NOT the full email address, change that immediately in your email client preferences. If you use Apple’s Mail app, that process is Mail > Preferences > Viewing > UNCHECK Use Smart Addresses.)

In case the reply-to address checks out, you can check out a link before you actually click on it.  Mac and Windows computers both use “context menus” for many things; you may not know they’re called this, but I’m betting you know how to bring them up.  Hover your mouse pointer over the link (or button) and right-click on it.  If you don’t have a two-button mouse or a trackpad that understands the concept of right-clicking, hold down the “CTRL” (Control) button on your keyboard and then click the button. You should get a context menu, which (on my Mac) enables copying the link, as such:

Then paste the link into a text editor (TextEdit, WordPad, etc.) and see if it looks legit.

Well that certainly doesn’t look like a PayPal address!

Here’s some alarming information about phishing that may wake you up a little.

  • 1 in 12.5 million spam emails generates a successful phishing attack
  • 14 billion spam emails are sent every day
  • 76% of US businesses suffered phishing attacks in 2017
  • The average email account receives 16 malicious emails a month
  • Over 92% of malware is delivered via email
  • The most common phishing attacks are emails disguised as invoices (bills), delivery failure notices, law enforcement actions, and package delivery notices
  • The FBI says phishing attacks and other email-based scams cost US businesses over $676 million in 2017

By taking just a few moments before clicking on the link in that legitimate-looking email, you can save yourself from a whole lot of trouble. Be Smart: Shop S-Mart… and also protect yourself from phishing attacks!

2018: the year in music

It’s once again the time of year when I talk about the new music I’ve discovered or new albums that captured my attention (and my money). Yes, I am still that guy that buys CDs, and I don’t apologize for it. I probably listen to music on my computer or phone 95 percent of the time; CDs only get played in the car, and even then I might use my phone to listen to podcasts or something like that when I’m driving.

Let’s cut right to it then. I bought 20 CDs in 2018, probably a record low of some sort. Thirteen of them would be considered metal of some sort. There was also four EPs (short albums of 3-7 songs), including two from friends’ bands. One of the EPs was surf music, one album was pop-tinged classic-style rock, there were two jazz guitar albums in there and one bluegrass/folk/Americana album. Two CDs were from all-female bands, and one from a female-fronted band.

BEST NEW ALBUMS OF 2018

Ghost_-_Prequelle_(album)1. GHOST – PREQUELLE. It’s not even fair this year. Ghost’s new album is fantastic, everything you expect from the shock-metal band plus a bitchin’ saxophone solo in a killer instrumental track. Releasing “Rats” as a single ahead of the album’s release was a brilliant marketing move. I rounded out the year in a fashion by going to see Ghost perform at a large theater in downtown Richmond. I enjoyed the show greatly, but at some level it was about the spectacle, because there wasn’t a lot in the live show that I haven’t heard already by listening to the other Ghost album I got in 2018, Ceremony & Devotion, a two-CD live album. That album was a little disappointing because it was mostly like listening to the album versions of the songs with a little banter between them. Still, Prequelle – best album of 2018. There’s no standout tracks, it’s a fantastic album front to back. (It’s OK if you skip the opening instrumental intro though – I do!)

2. MUSE – SIMULATION THEORY. This is probably the least metal album of Muse’s catalog. It’s almost like they set out to write a soundtrack album for a John Carpenter movie. Tons of electronic music, but Muse totally makes it work. What guitar is on the album is on point, and the bass and drums are thumpy and strong throughout. Muse’s music tends to be super dramatic, and Simulation Theory is no exception. An excellent listen.

3. UNCLE ACID AND THE DEADBEATS – WASTELAND. Their last album (The Night Creeper) disappointed me a bit, mostly because it wasn’t as awesome as Mind Control. Wasteland is about 95 percent as good as Mind Control. From my perspective, Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats are back with their most Sabbath-y sounding album yet, plus great production and good sounds all around. Call it post Sabbath, and yes, it’s that good.

4. STRYPER – GOD DAMN EVIL. This is Stryper doing what they do and doing it well. Twin guitars, great solos, soaring vocals, and everything you expect from middle-aged Christian metal maniacs. They’re kind of the anti-Ghost in every way if you know what I mean.

5. NOBUKI TAKAMEN – THE NOBUKI TAKAMEN TRIO. If you dig jazz guitar in the trio format (guitar, bass, drums), then you must get this album immediately.

THE REST

BLACK LABEL SOCIETY – GRIMMEST HITS. You gotta like BLS to like this album, but if you like BLS, you’ll love this album. It brings exactly what you expect from Zakk Wylde at this point, so if that’s what you dig, there’s no way you’ll be disappointed. Oh – by the way – it’s not a greatest hits compilation. It’s all new music!

SLEEP – THE SCIENCES. This album made a number of “best of 2018” lists, so I figured I better get it. It’s OK. I’m no overvwhelmed. It’s good, Sabbath-y sludge metal and they have a song called “Giza Butler” that mentions the gom jabbar, so I’m in. Still, I don’t know why it topped one of the best of 2018 lists – it’s good, but it’s not amazing.

I’M WITH HER – SEE YOU AROUND. I got this album because Sarah Jarosz plays on it and I think her music is amazing. I never heard of Sara Watkins or Aoife O’Donovan, but apparently they make I’m With Her some kind of bluegrass/folk/Americana supergroup. If you like any of those styles of music, you’ll dig this album.

7TH GRADE GIRL FIGHT – JUMP BACK/SUMMER IS OVER. Fun, engaging pop rock from Debra Guy, who I used to play with in Honeychuck. These two EPs came out less than three months apart, both in 2018, and you should get them. Check them out at 7thgradegirlfight.bandcamp.com.

MINOR 56 – MINOR 56. Dude. Atmospheric and psychedelic and weird and worth listening to on those days when you need a break from all the craziness going on around you. Check them out at minor56.com.

OK now, that’s it for the albums that came out during 2018 – but you know I got some albums that came out in previous years. Let’s get into those.

BEST ALBUMS I DISCOVERED IN 2018

Black_Sabbath_Heaven_and_Hell1. BLACK SABBATH – HEAVEN AND HELL/MOB RULES (1980/81). I have no idea why I didn’t listen to these albums until this year, but shame on me. “The Mob Rules” is hands down my favorite Black Sabbath song of all time, and all things considered it’s maybe the best song from this pair of Dio-led albums, but “Heaven and Hell” and “Neon Knights” sure give it a run for its money. I know there’s a lot of controversy around calling these Black Sabbath albums, and that’s probably why the boys called their touring band Heaven and Hell during the 1990s and beyond, but with the music behind Dio being classic Black Sabbath, I have no problem calling these Sabbath albums. They’re brilliant.

2. GOJIRA – L’ENFANT SAUVAGE (2012). L’ES doesn’t replace From Mars to Sirius as my favorite Gojira album, but DAMN it’s good. For a band I didn’t listen to until 2017, Gojira has quickly become one of my all-time favorite metal bands – even without guitar solos.

3. LIVING COLOUR – SHADE (2017). After reading something about Vernon Reid, I ended up on the Wikipedia page for Living Colour and discovered they put an album out last year! AND IT IS GOOOOOOOOD! It reminds me a lot of their 1993 album Stain, and I like that album a lot. Shade is heavy and melodic and angry and passionate and beautiful.

4. TEAMSTER – S/T (2015) + “Litany of Strength” (2018 single). Teamster’s drummer Sean Saley helped me and Steve Bowes out when we were working on demoing out the songs that would someday become the epic rock opera called FANTOMÉ. He played with Pentagram, then The Skull, but Teamster remained his hometown (DC) hardcore project. Their 2015 EP is well worth your hard-earned dollars. It’s a fantastic blend of punk and metal, with tight, aggressive playing and crisply written songs. “Litany of Strength” is a song they put out late this year, and it’s better than the stuff on the S/T EP. Check them out at teamster.bandcamp.com.

5. AJ GHENT – THE NEO BLUES PROJECT (2017). AJ played at the MOA rally in Iowa back in July and wow, what a great band. His EP is rock, blues, funk, soul and everything in between plus some great slide guitar playing.

THE REST

L.E.O. – ALPACAS ORGLING (2006). If you love ELO, you’ll likely dig this album. I got it because it features Andy Sturmer, former drummer/lead singer for Jellyfish, one of my favorite bands. I’ll tell you this, though – you gotta love ELO to dig this album.

TONY MACALPINE – MAXIMUM SECURITY (1994). An instrumental rock/metal album from way back. I was talking about it with a friend, and Tony had been in Steve Vai’s band for a while playing keyboard and guitar, so I wanted to check out this album I used to have on vinyl way back in the day. It’s not as good as I remember it, but it’s fun, classical-tinged instrumental stuff.

REINHARDT & STETLER – LIVE IN DER STADKIRCHE (2016). Dual acoustic guitar jazz. If that floats your boat (it does mine) then you definitely need this album.

RUSSIAN CIRCLES – EMPROS (2011). Instrumental metal – not quite progressive, but close. Really good, lots of fun, lots of texture and layers to it. Well worth checking out one of their albums to see if you dig their style of music. I think they’re from Texas, though, not Russia.

SMALL TOWN TITANS – THE HYBRID SESSIONS (2017) (EP). I got this because of their fantastic rendition of “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” It’s the best version of that song I have ever heard. No contest. The rest of the EP is OK. Not great, not terrible. It’s well recorded and the singer has a great voice, but beyond that it’s fairly standard hard rock.

THE SURFRAJETTES – THE SURFRAJETTES (2017) + “Party Line/Toxic” (2018 single). All-female surf band. Good surf music, catchy and poppy and fun. Five songs of joy right here. surfrajettes.bandcamp.com.

That’s it for new music for 2018.

Not a terribly exciting year for me music-wise, and even less so when it came to movies. I’m not even doing a post on movies for 2018, it was that weak. See you next year with the best music of 2019!

WHAT I LISTENED TO IN 2018

gojira mars siriusThis one is a little more cut and dried. Here’s the list of top listened-to albums for 2018.

  1. Gojira – From Mars to Sirius
  2. Ghost – Prequelle
  3. Ghost – Popestar (EP)
  4. Black Label Society – Stronger Than Death
  5. Black Sabbath – Heaven and Hell
  6. John Williams – The Soloist
  7. Black Sabbath – Mob Rules
  8. Cutting Crew – Broadcast
  9. Joe Satriani – Surfing With the Alien
  10. Slayer – God Hates Us All
  11. AC/DC – For Those About to Rock
  12. Baroness – Yellow & Green
  13. Sevendust – Black
  14. Dead Can Dance – The Serpent’s Egg
  15. Alice in Chains – Jar of Flies
  16. Gojira – The Way of All Flesh
  17. Gojira – Magma
  18. Kaleo – A/B
  19. Mastodon – Emperor of Sand
  20. Queen – Jazz

Doesn’t look at all like my lists from previous years. The most obvious absence is Pink Floyd’s Animals, which is usually in my top 10 and this year doesn’t hit the list until #26.

the Richmond Times-Dispatch ends candidate endorsements … for now

Ending the endorsements of political candidates in every election cycle is an interesting move on the part of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Their endorsements have never meant much to me – after all, they always endorsed the Republican, I hate the two-party system, so why would it matter?  (here’s the column by Tom Silvestri, president/publisher of the RTD)

In 2016 the RTD endorsed Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate for president. They didn’t do it for any high-minded ideals (pun intended!), but rather because they were never going to endorse Hillary Clinton and they couldn’t bear to endorse Donald Trump. They felt like they had to endorse somebody because that’s the way it had always been done.  They even said Johnson could be a viable candidate if only people would give him a chance – which they have refused to do for other Libertarian candidates in the last two years. Indeed, Libertarian candidates are consistently left out of debates and media coverage by outlets both major and minor, including the RTD.

What the Richmond Times-Dispatch should have done was endorse nobody, and explained why. Just because you CAN do something doesn’t mean you MUST do something.

Now, to another of Silvestri’s points, that they’re ending endorsements because it’s too difficult to explain the difference between the Editorial department and the News department in a newspaper, and to create an understanding that the News department can (and does) run opinion pieces that aren’t straight news.

I agree with Silvestri that this can be difficult, and one of the commenters even quipped that the Johnson endorsement caused him to cancel his subscription. There is clearly a disconnect between opinion and news is this country, with people – including many on Facebook and other social media outlets – conflating opinion with news.

When you can have pure opinion, news-based opinion, opinion-based news and straight news all in one publication, it can indeed be confusing to the casual reader. This is one of the greatest problems our society faces in the 21st century – we have become casual consumers of everything and as a result, we stubbornly refuse to put much thought into what we’re reading, watching or saying. Parroting the party line or screaming “fake news!” at every opportunity does nothing to further the discourse that drives our political system.

People forget that democracy, for better or worse, is less than 300 years old. It is still a fledgling system, and a difficult one to maintain at that. There will be ups and downs, highs and lows, bonuses and deficits, all to the benefit or detriment of much of the population.

Refusing to engage – as the RTD is saying it’s going to do in the future here – is abdicating one’s moral responsibility to the republic. That’s on us, the citizenship of the United States of America – every last one of us.

Frankly, doing something just because it’s always been done is the #1 stupidest reason to do something. If you’re not doing something because that’s what needs to be done, stop doing it. Traditions are worthless, because all they do is tie you to a past that may not be worth repeating or frankly, even remembering.

Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. Speak what you think now in hard words, and to-morrow speak what to-morrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict every thing you said to-day.” The RTD’s Johnson endorsement in 2016 cause an identity crisis on many sides. Internally, I’m sure they struggled with it. Externally, the readership that had come to expect de rigueur endorsements of Republicans found themselves stunned at the change they saw before them, perhaps unable to process what had just happened.

Our society’s greatest problem right now is its utter inflexibility, the refusal of so many to even consider an alternate idea, opinion, practice or process. Think about it – if Copernicus had simply gone along, we’d have never accepted the idea that the Sun – and not the Earth – is the center of our solar system.

Finally, should newspapers even be printing opinion pieces at all?  Is it their job – their responsibility – to tell me how they think I should be voting?  Or is it their job to gather the facts, express them in a clear, concise fashion, and let me come up with my own reasons for voting for this candidate or that one.

One of the reasons so many people trash reporters and cry about this or that being “fake news” is because of the high opinion-to-fact ratio present in much of modern mainstream journalism. The difference between news and opinion has largely become obscured to the point of pointlessness. When opinion is mistaken for news, the result is what kids today refer to as “butthurt” – that is, a great sense of offense at the words being printed or spoken.  When news is mistaken for opinion, facts cease to matter and there is no viable path to Truth.

I wish I could solve this last problem with the snap of my fingers or the wave of a magic wand.  I know that is unrealistic, and especially so as long as some among us steadfastly refuse to acknowledge that their opinions are not fact and continue to refuse to regard the opinions of others as having any validity at all.

some things we need to work on

A particularly unpleasant exchange on Facebook prompted me to write this. Stay with me, I think it’s important.

Calling somebody a pussy needs to stop being a go-to insult aimed at emasculating somebody. As we all know, pussy is a slang term for vagina, and it’s used in context to indicate your impression that the object of your derision is somehow weak, feminine and unworthy of your respect.

In all seriousness, if you want to see the strength and power of a pussy, watch a child being born. You will have a new and heightened respect for how powerful a pussy is. In a problem birth, instead of failing, the pussy holds strong, and sometimes the skin around it will tear. That’s how strong the pussy is – it forces other aspects of the body to fail because it refuses to fail itself.

If you call me a pussy, then, I refuse to feel weak. I will feel powerful. I will feel strong. I will feel resilient. Birthing a child is something no man can do, and it is the single most powerful expression of humanity there is.

Serving in the military does not make you a better person than I am. Holding a commission doesn’t make you smarter than I am.  Enlisting doesn’t make you more patriotic than I am. Being willing to kill somebody our government has decided is our collective enemy doesn’t make you more willing to kill than I am – it just means you got paid to do it by the government.

Serving in the military does not automatically make you a hero, nor does it automatically engender respect. You must still serve honorably to be respected for your time in uniform. You must behave heroically to be a hero. There are actual heroes in this world who have never served a day in uniform, and there are those who gave their lives for their country. Every country has heroes, dead and alive, and it’s not stripes on their sleeves or insignia on their collars that made them such.

I was part of a military family for 17 of my first 18 years. I grew up on military bases all over the USA and Europe. I have seen heroes and I have seen goldbricks, and I tell you this – there are way more goldbricks than there are heroes in the military forces of any nation. I have met men and women who, under orders and compelled by our government, have rained death and destruction down upon their fellow humans. Some of them are heroes, most of them are not. Doing your job does not make you a hero.

Having a different opinion about national events and policies does not make you smarter, more valuable as a citizen or more important than I am. It also does not give you the moral high ground. Disagreeing with you does not make me a traitor, nor does disagreeing with me make you one.

Having an opinion is one thing. Defending it with hurtful words and threats is something else. It takes a lot to offend me, but once I reach that point, you better believe I’m going to say something about it.